At The Crossroads, The Problem Is Choice

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At The Crossroads, The Problem Is Choice
Daemon Icon T-shirt @ Crossfit Notorious (Chicago)

Taylor (6’3”) is styled wearing our size medium daemon icon t-shirt in heavy metal.

At The Crossroads, The Problem Is Choice
Daemon Icon T-shirt @ Oakley Fight Club (Chicago)

Shara (5’9”, size 2) is styled wearing our size xs women’s daemon icon t-shirtin heavy metal.

At The Crossroads, The Problem Is Choice
Daemon Soundbox Baseball T-shirt @ Crossfit Notorious (Chicago)

Taylor (6’3”) is styled wearing our size medium daemon soundbox baseball t-shirt in gray/navy.

At The Crossroads, The Problem Is Choice
Daemon Idol T-shirt @ Crossfit Notorious (Chicago)

Taylor (6’3”) is styled wearing our size medium daemon idol t-shirt in black.

At The Crossroads, The Problem Is Choice
Multi-Idol Patch Sweatshirt @ Oakley Fight Club (Chicago)

Shara (5’9”, size 2) is styled wearing our size small multi-idol patch sweatshirt in navy.

At The Crossroads, The Problem Is Choice
Daemon Idol Hoodie @ Crossfit Notorious (Chicago)

Taylor (6’3”) is styled wearing our size medium daemon idol full-zip hoodie in black.

The Date:  Sunday, September 17, 1967
The Place:  The dressing rooms of The Ed Sullivan Show, 15 minutes before air time
The Actors:  Jim Morrison/The Doors, Ed Sullivan, the show producer
The Scene:  Riding high on the success of their first and then number 1 hit “Light My Fire” and moments from performing for the first time on the show that catapulted performers like Elvis Presley and the Beatles into stardom, the band is asked to change the song line “Girl, we couldn’t get much higher” to “Girl, we couldn’t get much better” to avoid it being misconstrued as a reference to drugs. A crossroad was reached and a choice had to be made. Take the easy road, make the simple word change with the prize of mainstream acceptance and success; or stay true to your art, your words, and your vision and, in turn, put your future in your own hands.

Our soundoff design release “the daemon” is all about choice. In ancient Greek belief, a daemon is a supernatural being of a nature that exists between gods and humans. It exists at an intersection. In his short 27 years on earth, Jim Morrison embodied a supernatural being of sorts, captivating generations with lyrics as raw as life itself put into melodies transporting our minds, bodies, and souls into transcendental places against the backdrop of a real life riddled with complication. An industry built on album sales, concert tours, merchandise sales, and the importance of achieving mainstream success can go against those who are in it truly for the artistry—artists like Morrison. Their lives are continually chipped away at under the pressures of being true to themselves versus meeting the many expectations placed on them.

Today, we are plagued with daily crossroads that come to us at rapid fire via our phones, tablets, televisions, laptops, and radios.

Do I #boycottlyft or #deleteuber?
Am I being American or not being American if I tweet #notmypresident?
Is it ok to like “Moonlight” over “Birth of a Nation”?
Do I vote my conscience or my party?
Do I protect the borders or boycott the ban?
And on, and on, and on, and on…

Seemingly black-and-white questions now yield only muddy gray answers. Our lives’ journey is now a minefield of crossroads. At every turn, we risk challenging discussions, soured friendships, and severed relationships from actions as simple as “checking in” at our neighborhood Starbucks while buying a cup of coffee.

Morrison and The Doors took the stage that night and sang “Light My Fire” as it was so expertly crafted in its original form. Post-performance, they were immediately informed of their sacrificing multiple future bookings on the show and that they were thereafter banned from future appearances, to which Morrison simply replied, “Hey, man, we just did the Sullivan show.” And the rest, as they say, is history.

At the crossroads, we all must make sacrifices no matter what turn we choose. And, sometimes, the sacrifice is worth the simple knowledge that we ultimately have the freedom to make that choice.

History is brimming with pain and suffering when choice was not so freely given or taken away. The choice to live. The choice to be free. The choice to vote. The choice to live your life openly.

History also regales those who took the harder road, prying open closed doors and fighting for liberties and social change that they would possibly never see in their lifetimes, but, rather, that they would gain for those that would come long after them.

The problem with choice is that we often fear facing the consequences of our choices. Sometimes, to achieve a greater solution, we need to find our strength to make choices unencumbered by immediate sacrifices, discomforts, or unknown fears.

“There are things known and things unknown and in between are the doors.” Jim Morrison

Written by:  Daryl Sneed
Edited by:  Suzanne Claussen
Photography by:  Bret Grafton
Models/Talent:  Taylor & Shara/Factor Chosen Chicago

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