Fight for the Right

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Fight for the Right
warrior icon t-shirt (pre-order)

the warrior icon t-shirt. screenprint design on short-sleeve crew neck t-shirt. 60% cotton/40% polyester. heather gray. classic fit. pre-order sizes XS-2X

Fight for the Right
warrior soundbox snapback (pre-order)

the warrior soundbox snapback. white color thread embroidered. classic high-profile flat bill snapback cap. cotton twill. black. soundoff embroidered on back. one size.

Fight for the Right
femme fatale soundbox snapback

the femme fatale soundbox snapback. metallic pink thread embroidered. classic high-profile flat bill snapback cap. wool blend. black. soundoff embroidered on back. one size.

Fight for the Right
nasty soundbox snapback (pre-order)

the nasty soundbox snapback. white color thread embroidered. classic high-profile flat bill snapback cap. cotton twill. black. soundoff embroidered on back. one size.

Fight for the Right
warrior soundbox beanie (pre-order)

the warrior soundbox beanie. white color thread embroidered. classic beanie cap. acrylic. black. soundoff embroidered on back. one size.

Fight for the Right
nasty soundbox beanie (pre-order)

the nasty soundbox beanie. white color thread embroidered. classic beanie cap. acrylic. black. soundoff embroidered on back. one size.

“Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. And so we must straighten our backs and work for our freedom.”  Martin Luther King, Jr.

 “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same.”  Ronald Reagan

Is there a silver lining from this election year?

For many, the next four years already seem daunting. The country is painfully divided post-election. We now base our prospective interactions (whether spending time with family/friends or maintaining social media connections) on who supported who in the election. Gay and lesbian couples are sprinting to the altar in fear that their hard-fought right to marry will be upended post inauguration. Walls are being discussed. Registries are being evaluated. New videos of biased policing are seen nightly. Tweets and memes are governing international relations. Predictions of an apocalyptic end to the world are becoming the norm.

We sit in wonderment trying to understand how this came to be. We elected an African-American as president—not once, but twice. Transgender women are on the cover of major magazines, garnering national TV shows and headlining runways. Women are making strides in business and several have broken the glass ceiling to run Fortune 500 boards and corporations. Immigrants and minorities make up the majority of the US population. We have overcome, the mountaintop has been reached, let freedom ring!

The silver lining is a wake-up call. 

The rose-colored sunglasses many of us wore thinking the future of equality was bright—because we anticipated several short-term wins would lead to long-term, sustained gains—have been forced off. The Women’s suffrage movement, Stonewall riots, Montgomery Bus Boycotts and marches on the US Capitol are now more than pages in history books. They are blueprints for the fight for civil rights—a fight that has not yet been won.

While we prepare to celebrate the conclusion of eight years of the country’s first African-American president, there is a separate reality for the remaining masses of underrepresented people: half of black Americans born poor remain poor, and even for those born into the middle class, a majority end up downwardly mobile by adulthood. People of Hispanic origin make up the largest ethnic/racial minority in the US, yet over 50% report being discriminated against. In 2015, Muslim Americans faced the highest level of assaults since 2001. Gays and lesbians continue to face large wage gaps and discrimination based on orientation and gender identity. And while we came close to electing our first female president, disparity in pay for equal work and threats to women’s personal well-being and health persist.

The fight continues. 

On January 21, 2017, the Women’s March on Washington is scheduled to take place. In Washington, DC, and in cities across the US, women and allies supporting human and civil rights will come together to send a unified message to our nation, our country’s leadership, and the world that we as a society cannot thrive under marginalization.

We at soundoff celebrate the expression and authentic voice taking shape—expression that can be traced back to icons and events that continue to greatly influence today’s culture. We are donating 15% of sales (through January 21, 2017) from our fight for the right series (see the attached product gallery) to support the Women’s March on Washington. The fight for the right is a call for solidarity and support. We encourage you to join the fight!

editorial:  Daryl Sneed, Drew Ferguson, Natasha Goburdhun

editor:  Suzanne Claussen

artist:  Bret Grafton

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